...or tries to...

Saturday, August 6, 2011

So much like...

I just finished a new sewn piece, so after naming it and photographing it and justifying its existence I can take a little breath. Think, or preferably, not think.

Mostly, I look. Look at pictures, look at things, pick things up. Remind myself about why I surround myself with certain objects. Why I go straight to them, bring them home, if I can.

I was given a piece of a hornet's nest today.


Amazing thing, and so much like my barnacled shell from Sanibel:



Not the same, not the same function, but all those visual analogies out there-it's really what I do, I think, just make analogies based on those intricacies everywhere I look. 


Mushroom coral, well, obvious. This one was Dad's.


 (The gills of a parasol mushroom out in the yard).

The odd fungus that popped up at the edge of the lawn after this summer's first rainstorm:



and a tree burr, if made much much smaller, 


is echoed in pollen, and I could go smaller, to the point where the smallest things pictured look like the oldest, furthest, largest objects in space. In my work, I'm primarily indifferent to scale, as our minds, thankfully, tend to be.

5 comments:

Daydreamer said...

Amazing, isn't it? The Medieval scholars had the whole universe organized in the Macrocosm - microcosm paradigm... they were looking at everything through their similarities of form and cataloging them accordingly. (I still like to think of the possibility that the electrons of an atom are really tiny planets in a solar system..... shades of Horton Hears a Who....!)

Daydreamer said...

Oh, and I meant to say what an AWESOME photo you took of that odd fungus in your yard! It looks almost supernatural! :)

Amy said...

Exactly! I loved Horton as a child and still do to this day-of all the books I read as a child it was based on the most complicated and sophisticated idea we can imagine. I think about scale every day. For me the merging of scale was all over my school science books, atoms and universes pictured nearly side by side-and then the eye-squint circle of the microscope and the telescope. I would love to know more about the Medieval classifications...

Amy said...

...and isn't that the freakiest fungus ever? I had never seen it before, or since, and I have no idea what it's called. There were a whole bunch of them, as if they were waiting through a long hot drought to pop up, then disappear again-even though it rains every day now I haven't seen anything like it again...

Amy said...

Anyway, I found out what they are-puffballs. When they dry up, they shoot spores into the air like a grandpa exhaling pipe smoke. I got to witness the spores myself, when I was out back with a rake...