...or tries to...

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Studio Verite


photo: Jacques de Beaufort

This post comes in squarely in the Shameless Self-Promotion catagory, so going in, believe me, I realize this. But it's also about a phobia that previously made my eyes roll back and my brain white-out, the concept of being videotaped. For me, it's been an almost primordial fear, something I felt I was born with, though I know that isn't true. It was a perfect example of nurture and nature, a combo of a bad audition, spur-of-the-moment tv interviews and some kind of inborn reticence. Artist Jacques de Beaufort, who video interviewed me for his series Studio Verite, and whose m.o. covers painting, drawing and film making, managed to make the entire process impossibly fantastic and natural and, possibly, life changing, as a fear-conquering experience should be. Maybe it serves to finally understand that we really don't know how things are going to turn out. Thank you, Jacques.



Studio Vérité: Amy Gross from Jacques de Beaufort on Vimeo.

Check out Jacques' intriguing studio visits here,

and his work here.

Oh, and hang in at the end of the video, there's a little doll house talk there too...

12 comments:

Love For Elise said...

What an interesting and inspiring video. I recently came across your work and find it just amazing. Thanks for sharing your process.

Amy said...

Thank you so much for stopping by, and for watching it! I think your work and your blog is beautiful. The little glass house that lights up especially.

Amy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Daydreamer said...

Wow, Amy! What a Wonderful Video!!!
Congratulations for overcoming your fear! The rest of us are the Richer for that!
I am thrilled to hear you talk more about your art.... and the how as much as the why! Jacques has done a Beautifully sensitive filming... and his questions are very good at bringing out the Inner You! You shine beautifully as you talk about the inspirations and the processes and the Essential Symbiosis of it all!
And of course, I am so glad he added the piece about the doll house....! The older I get the more I think of these doll house worlds as very real "pictures" of our inner selves.... whether we know it or not! Self Portraiture of an obscure form... but Portraits nonetheless!
Thank you for sharing this with the world!

Sans! said...

Amy,I too find it very very difficult to watch myself in a video. We have them made of our dance pracs after every session so that we can identify our problem areas after prac. It's been 3 years and I have not watched one single video made! LOL

I have however thoroughly enjoyed watching your interview which made me break into smiles every so often. Firstly, you looked amazing! It was so natural it felt like I was watching a very good actress portraying Amy Gross :). You know what I mean, "real" people always come across very awkward on tv. :)

The questions and your answers were executed like how you write. Poetic yet accessible, intimate yet simple. I felt like we know you and your art even better now.

I love that advice you gave. Thank you! ;) And coming a close 2nd to this part as my favourite bits of the interview, that dollhouse excerpt. I really wanted to hear the rest of what you'd said though because I think Jacques obviously thought it was art. Maybe you can fill us in?

Love For Elise said...

Thank you so much! I certainly had fun making it!

Amy said...

Betsy, I wish I could leave a comment as beautifully as you do. Thank you for watching it, too, and being so generous and kind. Jacques not only does beautiful work, art and video and art video, he figures how to expand what an artist does into a larger world, and make you feel like you're not just sitting away alone in a room, but part of a larger conversation. That's a true gift, I think.

Amy said...

Sans, thank you so so much. I understand you well, I could only watch the video twice, when my mom was showing it to her friend I had to leave the room. Maybe the world assumes that being committed to the small screen in any way is what we all do as humans in the 2000's, since everyone "seems" to be on tv, or Youtube, or on Facebook in some way. But it's not a natural thing for most of us, I think. I kinda don't want to know what I look like when I'm talking. I definitely never ever want to see what I look like when I dance!! But for me it was a big step towards being less self-conscious, in a weird way. It's like being afraid of crossing a bridge, maybe. You're so aware of everything when you're afraid of something, you see the bridge, yourself, the fear, the bad past experiences all at once, all really big and obvious and heavy. Maybe when you get over something you take a lot of yourself out of it, so everything falls back into scale, especially your own self...

The reason why I say that my doll house isn't my art, though I do think that miniaturization can be art, is because of my own definition of what art is to me personally. Does that make sense? Art for me is full of challenges like how much to reveal, how much to conceal, how much "idea" versus how much personal expression, and it's often about stuff that brings a lot of pain as much as joy. The doll house is just joy, without the idea of it being part of the outer world, it's just there to bring me joy. It's still art, but not as much what I define art for me personally....

Rachel said...

Thanks for sharing Amy, your work is inspiring!

Amy said...

Thank you , Rachel. Your flower series is beautiful, and I'm very partial to moths and bees too!

Shalini said...

Brilliant interview Amy. I would never have guess that you were nervous or anxious about it. I too hate being video taped and seeing myself on video. I loved hearing you talk about your art, and seeing it from all angles too.

Amy said...

That's all Jacques, he did work some magic there. I know what you mean, it can be so hard, because everything you say takes on weight, and I also tend to drift off on tangents, which can be fun in normal conversation, but gets weird on tape...Thank you for watching it, Shalini.