...or tries to...

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Isaac


Tropical Storm Isaac is far enough away, but his flailing forearms arms are soaking us with wind and water. This is the kind of weather that forces you to stay inside, that makes you have to consider the wisdom of doing normal things, like driving your car, like buying milk. It turns you into a reverse of a peeping Tom, staring out the windows at nature arguing with itself: rain going sideways,  palms flapping like flags. It turns the screens into abstract paintings. It pushes at the door. 

Weather sent to remind us that we're not in charge.

























9 comments:

Daydreamer said...

One Year ago, Amy, I was experiencing the remnants of Irene that so completely washed Vermont away..... I hope the rains and threatened tornadoes do not harm you! I like seeing out your windows and doors... I can feel that sense of embattled defenses... that hovering angst.... that insecurity that storms of any kind can bring to me.... and also that sense of comfort of being indoors... able to look out... And is that the roof of the little red barn I see by the window? What an inexplicable sense of comfort THAT brings me!!!
Thank you for posting this today, I have been watching the Weather Channel off and on all day... aware of the storm!

Alison said...

Beautiful photos of the rain! Issac should be arriving here shortly and now that the threat of being hit is gone, we can relax a little bit.

Sans! said...

I love the rain but maybe it's because I have never experienced a tornado or a hurricane which takes lives and causes havoc. I am still scared of thunder and lightning though. It's the closest thing to a harbinger of End Times for me.

We are experiencing a cold night here but that means 25 deg C. Hardly cold by your standard, I 'm sure.

Stay safe Amy!

Amy said...

Betsy, I couldn't believe Irene, I'm so used to weather being a southern problem that your storm was as if the planet had been turned upside down. It was so bizarre to be asking my brother in NY what his storm plan was. What did you do?

Yes, that's the little blue barn, watching the storm through its own set of windows!

Can you believe that it was worse all last night and this morning? There was a small tornado, a fatal car accident five minutes down the road, and flooding. From the arms of a tropical storm. I've been through 4 hurricanes, but this one, though not nearly as scary in any way, has dragged out for hours. The others were gone in a day. Just put a prayer out there for New Orleans...

Hi Alison, has it come your way yet? It shouldn't be too dangerous, but if you can stay inside, you'll definitely be a lot drier! I tried to go out to photograph during a break, but that break ended five minutes after I went out, and let's just say, I looked like a had taken a shower in my clothes. Stay safe!

Sans, if you can get through your whole life without the hurricane experience, I highly recommend that. I hate every part of it, the canned food, the trees falling over onto cars, the house shut up behind shutters like you're sealed into a tin can. It's like permanent night. I swore that after one big storm I would move out of Florida. Four hurricanes later, still here, though. One year we didn't take off the metal shutters because another hurricane hit two weeks after the first one. I used to wonder why people live in places so vulnerable, but we do. Maybe we need to pretend that we'll always be alright, so we can get up everyday. But if it ever tore off the roof, or really hurt someone I love, I might think twice about my choices...

sassysistersink said...

i've thought about you as the reports of isaac have increased, yet somehow, your photographs have a rather romantic feel to them. one positive thing that severe weather brings is a feeling of community amongst neighbors that you may rarely see. here in colorado it is more likely to be blizzards, and they inspire a reaching out to others that is quite special. glad you're safe!

Amy said...

That's so true. During our hurricanes we teamed up with our neighbors and brought back Red Cross supplies, went out reconnaissance carpools to check on the evacuated houses. It's probably not surprising to hear that in South Florida we don't normally see all that much of our neighbors, because it's much harder to get to know people who aren't here all year long. But when it counts, people are people, and seem to join together in trouble. I learned that when I lived in NY, there wasn't a time in NYC when someone didn't help me up when I slipped on ice - (I remember ice!), and I saw it happen with other people too, every time...

rosanna said...

Dear Amy, even in Italy we hear about Isaac and how terrible it seems.
I am very glad I have never experienced a hurricane although I already had my share of floods.
Yourics are beautiful as usual and the little barn looks so cosy in its window sill.
Yet the glass pane looks so fragile and useless against the fury of the wind.
Keep safe, keep inside and I sall think of all the endangered cities.
Hugs, Rosanna

Amy said...

Rosanna, thank you. My county has had a lot of flooding this week, but not nearly as much as New Orleans may be experiencing now. There seems to be a price to pay for living in places we love, just being near the water. I've never lived more than a few miles from the ocean, my best memories, even my best summer jobs were on the water. But when nature boils up, it seems to be the most unforgiving place to love. But we stay, don't we?

Leslie said...

Stay safe! Your photographs are hauntingly beautiful.